Bad Time to Sneeze – Agis king suppluments

Posted on by Nikolay Cherevan

What’s Really Going On with Seasonal Pollen Allergies, Histamines, and You

 

Right now more than ever, no one wants to cough, sneeze, or even so much as utter sniffle while in public. While you’re sure it’s just your seasonal pollen allergies acting up, those uneasy stares are never any fun. Neither are the common symptoms of your seasonal pollen allergies.

 

Some people experience mild symptoms when they encounter pollen during their seasonal allergies, sometimes known as hay fever. For others, it’s extreme and interferes with daily life. You might start sneezing only when you go outdoors, encounter a runny or stuffy nose, have watery and itchy eyes, ear congestion, and postnasal drainage or itchy sinuses, both of which can cause you to cough up a storm.

 

In light of the pandemic, seasonal pollen allergies are even more troublesome since others assume the worst. They inch away in fear and you’re left to feel like you have the plague.

 

It’s very possible for allergies to develop in adulthood, so if you notice with the change of seasons that something is amiss, you may want to find out what you’re allergic to. There are different triggers for fall, spring, and summer though because plants are dormant in winter, seasonal allergies during that time are uncommon. In fact, you may love winter just because you finally get some relief!

 

Seasonal Breakdown of Allergies

  • Spring- The trees are back in bloom which birch, cedar, willow, and horse chestnut being the most common to set off hay fever.
  • Summer – It’s called ‘hay fever’ for this reason, when hay is cut but grasses and weeds are what will bring on your symptoms during this season.
  • Fall – Because it’s ragweed season and they’re notoriously difficult to control, the pollen from this invasive plant species is everywhere.
  • Winter – You might find relief in this season, but with heavy winters comes being indoors where lurking allergens like dust mites, mold, or pet dander can bring on your seasonal allergies.

 

Here Come Histamines

If you have hay fever, your immune system flags something in the air that is harmless as something of a danger. So your body releases histamines along with other chemicals into your blood stream and that creates an allergic reaction. This carefully orchestrated chain of events starts with a signal to the mast cells located in your nose, mouth, lungs, gut, blood, and skin to release the histamines.

 

They flow from the mast cells into your blood and boost it in that part of your body that this allergen impacted which leads to inflammation. So, if you went for a walk at the park and your nose was impacted by pollen, your histamines in the membranes create more mucus which is why your nose gets stuffy or runny and you’ll sneeze. That mucus can also trickle down your throat, leading to the cough that no one wants to hear during coronavirus times.

 

Identifying which seasonal pollens and allergens are causing you woe is important. While you won’t always be able to avoid it, you can find solutions to manage your seasonal allergies.

What’s Really Going On with Seasonal Pollen Allergies, Histamines, and You

 

Right now more than ever, no one wants to cough, sneeze, or even so much as utter sniffle while in public. While you’re sure it’s just your seasonal pollen allergies acting up, those uneasy stares are never any fun. Neither are the common symptoms of your seasonal pollen allergies.

 

Some people experience mild symptoms when they encounter pollen during their seasonal allergies, sometimes known as hay fever. For others, it’s extreme and interferes with daily life. You might start sneezing only when you go outdoors, encounter a runny or stuffy nose, have watery and itchy eyes, ear congestion, and postnasal drainage or itchy sinuses, both of which can cause you to cough up a storm.

 

In light of the pandemic, seasonal pollen allergies are even more troublesome since others assume the worst. They inch away in fear and you’re left to feel like you have the plague.

 

It’s very possible for allergies to develop in adulthood, so if you notice with the change of seasons that something is amiss, you may want to find out what you’re allergic to. There are different triggers for fall, spring, and summer though because plants are dormant in winter, seasonal allergies during that time are uncommon. In fact, you may love winter just because you finally get some relief!

 

Seasonal Breakdown of Allergies

  • Spring- The trees are back in bloom which birch, cedar, willow, and horse chestnut being the most common to set off hay fever.
  • Summer – It’s called ‘hay fever’ for this reason, when hay is cut but grasses and weeds are what will bring on your symptoms during this season.
  • Fall – Because it’s ragweed season and they’re notoriously difficult to control, the pollen from this invasive plant species is everywhere.
  • Winter – You might find relief in this season, but with heavy winters comes being indoors where lurking allergens like dust mites, mold, or pet dander can bring on your seasonal allergies.

 

Here Come Histamines

If you have hay fever, your immune system flags something in the air that is harmless as something of a danger. So your body releases histamines along with other chemicals into your blood stream and that creates an allergic reaction. This carefully orchestrated chain of events starts with a signal to the mast cells located in your nose, mouth, lungs, gut, blood, and skin to release the histamines.

 

They flow from the mast cells into your blood and boost it in that part of your body that this allergen impacted which leads to inflammation. So, if you went for a walk at the park and your nose was impacted by pollen, your histamines in the membranes create more mucus which is why your nose gets stuffy or runny and you’ll sneeze. That mucus can also trickle down your throat, leading to the cough that no one wants to hear during coronavirus times.

 

Identifying which seasonal pollens and allergens are causing you woe is important. While you won’t always be able to avoid it, you can find solutions to manage your seasonal allergies.